Top 10 wine trends for 2014

1. A new era of discovery

imag0534Despite predictions of a decline in importance, the UK will retain its mantle of “shop window” for the world of wine, albeit in an evolving and more eclectic fashion. As ever growing global demand for long established and big hitting names such as Bordeaux and Burgundy continues to put such wines out of the reach of British consumers, the value and interest inherent in less-well trodden regions and emerging countries continues to come to the fore.

“We are finally seeing strong growth in the off-piste areas of our list and particularly from European regions, with Bierzo, Hungary, Campania, Basilicata, Vinho Verde, Switzerland and even Germany performing really well, while ‘exotics’ like Turkey and China are starting to pull their weight,” says Alex Hunt MW, purchasing director at Berkmann Wine Cellars.

He continues: “I’m not predicting the sudden disappearance of the mainstream, but the fact that diversification is now translating into sales gives me great encouragement for an even more interesting wine scene in 2014.”

According to Claudio Martins, manager at New Street Wine Shop in the City of London, this trend is not simply being driven by an age of austerity, but also a genuine newfound interest in more individual wines as a new generation of wine drinkers reveals itself to be more adventurous that its predecessors.

“People are looking to discover new countries, such as Croatia, realising that places such as Chile are making premium wines, and while City spending on Champagne is picking up again, people are not opting for grandes marques, but seeking out smaller growers as a point of difference,” says Martins.

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