Waitrose supports South African wine industry with discounted case

To help support the struggling South African wine industry, Waitrose has launched a curated case of wines with a 25% discount for its customers for a limited time.

Launching on Waitrose Cellar today (29 July) the limited edition South African case has been put together by Waitrose to help boost sales following a ban on domestic wine sales in the country.

Priced at £62 for six bottles and £125 for 12, the case features a variety of wine styles from regions across the country.

Inside the case you’ll find Springfield Estate Sauvignon Blanc 2019; Reyneke Organic Chenin Blanc 2019; Rustenberg Chardonnay 2019; Ghost Corner Pinot Noir 2017; Journey’s End Sir Lowry Cab Sauvingon 2017 and Waitrose No.1 Cederberg Syrah 2018.

“It’s been really hard to see our fantastic winemakers in South Africa struggle with the domestic sales ban, some of whom we have worked with for over 20 years,” said Waitrose’s South African wine buyer, Victoria Mason.

“We have such a brilliant range of South African wines and we wanted to help  in whatever way we could. By putting these wines together in a special case at a great price, we hope our customers will order one and help support the industry,” Mason added.

12 Responses to “Waitrose supports South African wine industry with discounted case”

  1. Mary Hurley says:

    Fantastic deal on your SAWines.

  2. Joseph says:

    Considering the wines listed are cheap here in Soth Frica Waitrose ate still making huge profits whilst the farm workers struggle. All the profits go to farm owners whilst the workers are on Low pay.

  3. Joseph mc dermott says:

    The wines listed in the deal are the cheap South African wines so Waitrose are still making HUGE profits whilst the farm workers are on very low pay.

    • Greg says:

      No they are not. They are all good SA wines but yes, obviously a lot cheaper in SA as the are produced there and also the favourable exchange rate.

  4. Bridget Reynolds says:

    Great deal and thank you for supporting the SA wine industry 🙂

  5. Fruity says:

    Where do I order

  6. Henk says:

    What a wonderful gesture but it is sold out already! 🙁

  7. Simon says:

    Joseph – farm workers are paid by the farm/winery, not by Waitrose ! If you have a problem with what they are paid, it’s a South African issue. Also, it is costly to ship wines all the way from SA to the UK, then have to pay UK duty & taxes. Then, pay all the links in the supply chain and finally, Waitrose staff who also have to be paid.

    • Mike de baf says:

      Tell him that
      people will always find issue with everything. even if Waitrose starts distributing money to farmers someone will still find something to complain about. they would say it’s too little, it’s a mockery

  8. Dear Joseph

    A wonderful opportunity arises with this platform to explain to you and many others where the profits go from our product that is sold in London.

    To give you some context, I would like to tell you about my week since Wednesday.

    On Wednesday I went to the nearest town to open a bank account for our Workers’ Association – been going strong for a while now, but we are ready to have our own account. This town is an hour away from the farm were we work – on a gravel road that goes over two mountain passes – a nightmare for some, especially during the winter storms, but part of our lives. We do this trip regularly to meet our workers’ social, medical, business and educational needs. You can ask the Waitrose staff – they visit the very isolated farms like ours here in the Cederberg to make sure that many issues on the farm – including the living and working conditions of the staff – are properly managed and this before they put the product on their shelves

    Also on Wednesday, the nurse that visits our clinic came to the farm. This clinic was built with enormous support of the Waitrose Foundation International. Joseph, you should have been here a year ago when this clinic was completed. What utter joy! We did it our way on that day: no media, no trumpets! Just a natural process of creating something for our community.

    Last night I sat with 12 school-leavers, all children of workers here at Cederberg Wines. The world is at their feet, but because of COVID, the way forward is not clear. It was the Waitrose Foundation (SA) that suggested taking them away on a special weekend to talk about their dreams and desires. And although it is still under wraps, we will soon be announcing plans for our primary school kids for 2021.

    The Waitrose Foundation (SA) keeps close tabs on our processes. And we love their support. In fact, I cannot imagine my life on the farm without their guidance. Raymond is our man.No, Angel!

    As for the quality of the wines – I suggest that Waitrose tells you about the process they follow to choose the wines in their selection. I can just add, using the Waitrose Foundation Shiraz as an example: in 2019 Cederberg Wines received the Shiraz of the year trophy at the prestigious International Wine and Spirit Competition in London, and the sought-after International Red Wine Producer trophy at the show sponsored by Jing Song.

    I would like to invite you to visit our farm when next you are in South Africa. Then you can taste the Shiraz with us, talk to the farm workers and visit the facilities created thanks to the support of the Waitrose Foundation. And the people of the UK!!

    Pieter du Toit
    Online and Social Responsibility Manager of Cederberg Wines

    Please Google Cederberg Private Cellar to visit us

    https://www.google.co.za/maps/place/Cederberg+Private+Cellar/@-32.5038031,19.2555493,17z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m5!3m4!1s0x1c32924a5e54717f:0x90321027f26bf42!8m2!3d-32.5038031!4d19.257738

    • Michael Smith says:

      Thanks for this explanation of how your farm works.

      Here in London, I am longing to visit SA again, and experience the wonderful hospitality of South Africans, as well as sampling superb wines ‘in situ’.

      I should add that part of the cost of wines in the UK is made up of Excise Duty, leaving even less for South African farmers.

  9. Thank you Simon. Thank you Mike! And please feel free to visit as well!!

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