Genetically modified wine? Experts find the gene that adds flavour to beer and wine

9th November, 2017 by Edith Hancock

Researchers in Belgium have discovered the gene in yeast responsible for giving beers and wine their sweet flavour.

Yeast could be genetically modified to produce new flavours.

The experts claimed they could inset the DNA into brewers’ batches, producing truly new and unique flavours.

The study, which was published in the American society for Microbiology, could be used to grow genetically-modified yeasts to produce new flavours.

A flavour compound called phenylethyl acetate is responsible for bringing out the rose or honey flavours in beer and wine.

The researchers used DNA analysis to study genes in a strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, — commonly known as brewer’s yeast.

The study found that alleles or ‘versions’ of two genes, TOR1 and FAS2, were responsible for the highest production of phenylethyl….

Continue reading

Get unlimited access to The Drinks Business, from just £10.75 per month

Join The Drinks Business
Already a subscriber?

2 Responses to “Genetically modified wine? Experts find the gene that adds flavour to beer and wine”

  1. Rob Ingram says:

    screw Monsanto

    would you like some carcinogen with your wine sir?

  2. harry de schepper says:

    could this also happend to other fermented products , bread ?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Subscribe to our newsletters