Drappier ‘first’ carbon neutral Champagne house

2nd February, 2016 by Lauren Eads

Champagne Drappier has laid claim to being the first Champagne house to reduce its carbon footprint to zero after a 10-year effort.

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Champagne Drappier’s solar panels in Urville, France

To date, 45% of the electricity used by the House is produced by solar panels, with the house dedicating itself to sourcing sustainable energies over the past decade. By 2017 that number will increase to 75%. The producer avoids using air conditioning in its cellars by utilising a free cooling system, with isolated air conditioning systems strategically used throughout the property.

Further offsetting its carbon footprint, Drappier has recently invested in a wind turbine company in India and, as of Janaury 2016, claims to be the first Champagne House in the world to have reduced their carbon emissions to a net zero carbon footprint.

“Investing in a sustainable project in India is our way of expressing gratitude to this small, but dynamic, market for Champagne”, said Michel Drappier, winemaker and CEO of Champagne Drappier.

The house also plans to “aggressively reduce fuel consumption” over the next five years, with a number of projects already underway.

In 2014 its efforts on sustainability were extended to include organic winemaking practices, when a large proportion of its vineyards achieved accreditation.

A carbon footprint is defined as the level of greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide CO2 and methane) caused by an organisation, event, product or individual. An organisation’s carbon footprint can be reduced, or offset, by reducing waste and energy use, and investing in environmentally sustainable projects, such as wind turbine farms.

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One Response to “Drappier ‘first’ carbon neutral Champagne house”

  1. Renos Ross says:

    The science on wind farms show lots of negatives. Firstly, the energy needed to produce the blades is substantial, and when they fail – and they do often the replacement cost is significant. Will Dappier benefit from the electricity generated in India (and cheap labour used exploiting workers)? Is this just a feel good moment. As someone also involved in the wine industry I would never ever have a wind farm near or on my site nor would I invest in that extravagance.

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