8 things you should know about Prosecco

31st March, 2015 by Lauren Eads

It has a really long history

Prosecco dates back to the Roman times when the Glera grape was first grown in the village of Prosecco, an area formerly known as Puccino.

Its roots lie in Ribolla, a popular style of wine in the area during the 16th century, and which would later go on to be known as Prosecco. The wine was well-regarded by the Roman writer Pliny the Elder and Emperor Augustus’ wife Livia who believed it had healing capabilities and could help them live longer. Enjoyed by dignitaries of the time, it became known as “castellum nobile vinum Pucinum”, named after the castle adjacent to the small village of Prosecco in a bid to distinguish it from imitations.

It later came to be known as Prosecco with….

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5 Responses to “8 things you should know about Prosecco”

  1. loris says:

    9 things you should now about Prosecco…along with the DOCG Conegliano – Valdobbiadene there’s the DOCG Asolo Superiore. Not mentioned in this article and not shown in map. Not good!!

  2. sira says:

    Actually, the full correct name of the region is “Friuli-Venezia Giulia”.
    Ioris is right when saying the “Asolo-Prosecco” or “Collli Asoloni” has not been mentioned.
    Do you really think that Pinot Noir is allowed ? Was’nt it Pinot Blanc ? As far as I know Pinot Noir is used for a rosè sparkling wine in that area – but of course, this cannot be labelled as Prosecco. Prosecco rosé does not exist.

  3. Federica says:

    The correct name of the area is Veneto, where Valdobbiadene, Conegliano and Asolo are based
    The main DOCG are is made by the valdobbiadene and Conegliano hills
    Best regards

  4. Thank you Lauren & The Drinks Business
    Education is essential to distinguish DOCG proseccos and this is an excellent
    8 point summary.
    We support your communication of quality and look forward to
    sharing the knowledge with your readers & ours.

    Cordiali Saluti

  5. Peter Dushko says:

    Education and knowledge are power.
    If those in the know inform, then the opportunities for all to taste Prosecco as it was intended to be, rather than the product made “by the rules”,increase. For me , the wines from a genuine vineyard, as opposed to those with made up Italian sounding name, are the stars. The Italian equivalent to chateau bottled.
    I sell (and drink) both the wines from Valdobbiadene- Conegliano and Asolo because there is a difference. Each one has its place, dependent on mood and food

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