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Greek wineries captured on camera

Photographer Colin Hampden-White captures the beauty of Crete and Santorini in a pictorial tour of the Greek wine-producing islands.

View from the Santorini Winery DSC_0651A
Photo credit: Colin Hampden-White

Colin’s love of Greece stems from many years holidaying in the country, and although he says that he has always enjoyed the wines, he does admit that they tend to taste better in situ.

“The wines are fantastic when you are out there, especially the salty dry wines of Santorini which are wonderful in the sun or on a terrace, but they are not always quite the same back here [in the UK].”

As for the wineries, Colin explains that it’s easy to visit producers whether or not they are set up for commerce.

“You can visit lots of the cellars even if they don’t sell wines at the cellar door… they are stunning places and the people are so open,” he says.

Continuing he says, “The willingness to share seems very genuine, rather than forced – sometimes it’s just a matter of asking to look round, and they are delightful.”

He also records an increased openness to visitors and professionalism due to the economic situation.

“Greece seems to be changing and adapting and making money any way they can now.”

Colin has also photographed the star winemakers of Bordeaux, Burgundy and Champagne, as well as the faces behind Scotland’s top malts.

Ted Manousakis
Photo credit: Colin Hampden-White

Pictured above is America-based Greek businessman Ted (Theodoros) Manousakis who founded Manousakis Winery when he planted his first vines at the family home in Crete in 1993.

By 1997 he had built a “tiny” stone winery to handle the first harvest, although the producer now uses a bigger one following a €2 million investment.

Nostos
Photo credit: Colin Hampden-White

The winery’s flagship wine is called Nostos, which loosely translates as “homecoming”. 

The new Manousakis winery
Photo credit: Colin Hampden-White

“I’ve seen Manousakis progress from an old shack,” records Colin, who visited the producer last year as they harvested the grapes for vinifying at the new winery, which is pictured above.

The old Manousakis Winery
Photo credit: Colin Hampden-White

And here is the old Manousakis Winery, complete with an ancient olive tree.

Alexandra Manousakis
Photo credit: Colin Hampden-White

Pictured above is Ted Manousakis’ daughter, Alexandra, who has been running the winery for the last five years.

Ioannis and Kostis Galanis
Photo credit: Colin Hampden-White

Father and son team Ioannis (left) and Kostis Galanis manage the winemaking at Manousakis.

According to Colin both studied winemaking at Montpellier.

Despite the presence of the old wooden vat, the pair are pictured in the new Manousakis winery, and Colin points out that the pipe by Ioannis’s right foot leads into the barrel cellar so the wine can be transferred without pumping. 

The new Manousakis winery
Photo credit: Colin Hampden-White

And here is the new Manousakis ageing cellar.

Ioannis and Kostis Galanis
Photo credit: Colin Hampden-White

This shows the two winemakers posing proudly in front of a new vertical press. 

Kostis Galanis
Photo credit: Colin Hampden-White

Kostis captured in the old winery, but standing in front of the same wooden vat which featured in the image above. 

Manousakis Vinards at 600 metres
Photo credit: Colin Hampden-White

A plot of Syrah planted at 600 metres with the White Mountains in the distance and a new planting on the left. 

Manousakis Vineyards
Photo credit: Colin Hampden-White

This image of the same Manousakis vineyard, but from the top, shows not only the altitude but proximity to the sea. 

Manousakis Vineyards
Photo credit: Colin Hampden-White

The vineyards are certified organic and due to Ted’s American connection, 50% of production goes to the US. 

SAN..TORINI WINERY
Photo credit: Colin Hampden-White

Switching to Santorini, Colin captures a temporary worker at the island’s San… Torini Winery. Colin says that this winery makes a Nykteri and Assyrtiko but are “best known for a fantastic Vin Santo which ages brilliantly”.

Santorini Winery
Photo credit: Colin Hampden-White

Colin then shifts his focus to the island’s cooperative called the Santorini Winery. Above is a winemaker from the operation.

Santorini Winery
Photo credit: Colin Hampden-White

And here is another winemaker at the Santorini Winery. 

View from the Santorini Winery
Photo credit: Colin Hampden-White

Finally, Colin brings us a view from the terrace at the Santorini Winery, which he says is “great for sunsets”.

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