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Friday 31 October 2014

Alcohol tax could fund addicts’ treatment

18th August, 2014 by Lauren Eads

A think tank is urging the UK Government to put a new tax on alcohol to fund the treatment of drink and drug addicts.

alcohol

For years the “full recovery” of alcoholics has been the “preserve of the wealthy “, according to CSJ director Christian Guy.

The Centre for Social Justice (CSJ) has said that by levying a tax on alcohol, drink and drug addicts could be treated in “abstinence” treatment centres, helping to tackle addiction in the UK.

It would see a “treatment tax” of one penny per unit added to off-licence alcohol sales by the end of the next Parliament, raising £1.1billion over the next five years, rising to two pence per unit after 2024. It would mean that after 2024, the average price of a bottle of wine with around 12 units could rise by 24 pence.

The CSJ’s Ambitious for Recovery report, part of the CSJ’s Breakthrough Britain 2015 series, said around 300,000 people in England are addicted to opiates and/or crack, while 1.6 million are dependant on alcohol.

Christian Guy, CSJ director said: “Addiction rips into families, makes communities less safe and entrenches poverty.

“For years full recovery has been the preserve of the wealthy – closed off to the poorest people and to those with problems who need to rely on a public system. We want to break this injustice wide open.”

The measures would raise £155m a year from 2015, rising to about £520m a year from 2024 – funds which would go toward CSJ’s calls for the Government to fund treatment centres for 58,000 addicts per year by 2024.

Money raised would be spent “solely on setting up a network of abstinence-based rehabilitation centres and funding sessions within them. Official records show that the best residential centres in the country get more than 50 per cent of patients free from their addiction problems”, the report said.

However the Wine and Spirit Trade Association (WSTA), which represents the drinks trade, said any tax hike on alcohol would be unfair.

A spokesperson said: “UK consumers already pay some of the highest rates of duty on alcohol in Europe. Currently, the UK has the third highest rate of duty on wine and the fourth highest duty rate for spirits in the EU.

 “Further increasing the cost of wine and spirits would undermine an important UK industry which supports almost half a million jobs and in 2012/13 over £40bn of economic activity.”

Other measures proposed by the think tank include scrapping the drug advice site FRANK, involving job centres in identifying and helping addicts and offering benefit claimants with addiction problems support and “abstinence-based” treatment with the threat of sanctions if help is refused.

2 Responses to “Alcohol tax could fund addicts’ treatment”

  1. This extra tax to treat addicts makes my blood boil. Once again everyone is punished for the minority who abuse alcohol with the blunt instrument of blanket taxation. We are an independent shop focussing on quality wines, beers and spirits. We sell responsibly, we concentrate on education with wine/beer/whisky tastings and wine courses. We don’t offer multi-buy discounts, BOGOF’s, 3 for a tenner or any other inducements to encourage people to buy more than they require. We also don’t sell sweets or soft drinks to encourage underage drinkers, and we don’t sell cigarettes. We do everything we can to encourage our customers to buy and drink responsibly, yet we are punished just the same as a grotty Bargain Booze, Booze Buster or your average supermarket which everyone knows are the real culprits in this matter.

    Why not target these shops directly instead of us small, responsible independents who are trying to make a living without causing harm to anyone? It beggars belief that the Government are paying some think tank a fortune to overlook the blindingly obvious! Make a minimum price for a unit of alcohol, make it illegal to sell alcohol below cost price, and outlaw BOGOF’s and multibuys for alcohol.

    Not hard is it? Unless of course the Government just rolls over and does exactly what Lord Sainsbury wants or he’ll withdraw his campaign funds. But I’m sure I’m just being cynical…..

  2. Dave Bradbury says:

    Is there any guarantee that the monies raised from this scheme would be diverted to treat addicts. I think not – has Air passenger duty resulted in a lowering of carbon emissions or are countries such as China and India burning vast amounts of more coal year on year whatever extra it costs me for a holiday flight.

    I can not agree on a minimum price per unit of alcohol etc.as it would be difficult to enforce and encourage further smuggling.

    It has been said that businesses aren’t taxed but merely pass on the cost to the consumer. This is true but if a business wants to sell below cost price why should the VAT due on that sale be reduced because of a deliberate lowering of price. In any other sphere of taxation wouldn’t this be considered tax avoidance?

    I wouldn’t make it illegal to sell below cost but I would make it illegal to fail to account for and pay the tax that would have been due on a reasonable market price. This of course means the business would pay for it’s actions. I’m convinced that this would net far more to the Treasury and the money collected through existing tried and tested systems.

    As for opiates and other drug abuse I’m struggling with this perhaps the think tank can look at taxing aspirin or paracetamol or maybe I’m just being cynical……

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