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Wednesday 26 November 2014

Kids given ‘beer goggles’ to warn of alcohol

21st January, 2014 by Lauren Eads

A UK council has taken a novel approach to teaching children about the effects of excessive drinking by making them wear “beer goggles.” 

Schoolchildren trying out the 'beer goggles.' Photo provided by Hinkley and Bosworth Borough Council.

Schoolchildren trying out the ‘beer goggles.’ Photo provided by Hinkley and Bosworth Borough Council.

In an attempt to teach children about the negative effects alcohol can have on the body, students at Market Bosworth High School in Leicestershire were asked to wear ‘beer goggles’ to simulate effects of being under the influence such as slow reaction times, confusion and visual distortion.

The children were also shown a pickled liver to drive the message home.

The session was hosted by the community safety team at Hinkley and Bosworth Borough Council which runs interactive drug and alcohol awareness workshops in schools throughout the year.

Councillor David Bill, chairman of the Community Safety Partnership, said: “It is really important that we teach the youngsters in our community about the risks and consequences of substance misuse.

“We need to give them information and advice so that they are in a position to make informed decisions and fully understand what risks they are taking by drinking alcohol or taking drugs.”

Anne Warner, head of year seven at the school, said: “Our students were enthused by the quality of workshops provided by the safety crew.

“They provided excellent sound advice on a number of issues including drugs, alcohol and anti-social behaviour.

“The information made the children think about the consequences of smoking and drugs and they all learnt lots of new things that will help them to make informed choices about keeping healthy and safe in the future”.

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