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Tuesday 22 July 2014

WSTA warns that Christmas prices will soar

18th December, 2012 by Andy Young

The Wine & Spirit Trade Association (WSTA) has warned consumers that they could face a huge price hike for Christmas drinks, if the UK government’s plans for minimum alcohol pricing go ahead.

The price of stocking up for Christmas could riseWith less than a week to go until Christmas the WSTA has said that the government’s plans to introduce a minimum unit pricing for alcohol could cost consumers an extra £17.

The Association has researched the impact of minimum pricing as well as the proposed ban on multi-buy discounts. According to the WSTA a price of 50p per unit of alcohol could see the cost of stocking up for Christmas rise from £46.96 to £63.91.

WSTA chief executive Miles Beale said: “Our research shows the true impact that minimum unit pricing will have on hard pressed families as they prepare for Christmas, adding nearly £17 to a typical Christmas drinks shop. It is unrealistic for the government to pretend this policy won’t hit responsible consumers, preparing to celebrate Christmas with their family and friends.

“It is time for David Cameron to use some common sense, listen to his Cabinet colleagues, and drop this unfair and ineffective policy now.”

The WSTA’S research shows that the price of three bottles of wine will increase from a multi-buy of three for £10 to £14.63 and three bottles of cava will go up from £11.97 to £12.93.

As part of stocking up for Christmas the WSTA has costed a bottle of whisky, which increases from £10.32 to £14 and a bottle of Sherry, which rises to £5.63 from £4.67. The WSTA also warns consumers that the final increase will see a 20-pack of beer rise from £10 to £16.72.

2 Responses to “WSTA warns that Christmas prices will soar”

  1. Andi says:

    all good for us on-trade

  2. Yes please, bring on minimum pricing.

    50p a can is not a responsible price and paying £4.88 for a bottle of plonk is no bad thing, supporting as it does the humble supplier (who’s being battered much less on price by the multiples, I’d hope) and makes better quality wines more competitive.

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