Canadian bar charges £9 for Bud Light to promote craft beer

A Canadian bar has opted for stick over carrot to promote local breweries — charging $15 (£9) for a bottle of Bud Light.

The Prairie Firehouse gave the mainstream brew an eye-watering mark-up in a bid to promote the bar’s selection of locally-sourced beers, which had fallen out of favour with patrons.

“There’s a few people who still think its a joke,” Anna Dumas, owner of the Prairie Firehouse told The Brandon Sun.

“Then they get the bill.”

The astronomic price-tag garnered media attention last week after beer writer Cody Lobreau posted the Firehouse’s drinks list on Twitter.

“I never thought I’d see the day where a 341mL bottle of Bud Light would cost more than a 500mL can of Surly Todd the Axeman,” he said.

Staff at the bar were quick to reply, confirming that it was “not a typo.”

“We charge $15 for bud light to encourage people to drink real beer,” read the tweet. “We serve numerous craft, local delicious beers made by hardworking entrepreneurs that are $6-$10.

“Why would you buy a beer with 24 ingredients for $15 over a beer with 5 ingredients for $6?”

The idea of charging high prices for the mainstream lager came from of Dumas’ chefs, who had previously worked at a restaurant where a bottle of Bud Light sold for $25 (£15).

The move has been met with mixed response. While some people showed support for the bar’s attempt to discourage patrons from buying the Anheuser-Busch InBev product, others said that it was proof that the Firehouse’s range of craft beers doesn’t “hold its own” against Bud Light.

“If you have to increase the pricing of @budlight so people will be forced to drink your product, your product doesn’t speak for itself nor hold its own,” one user said.

One Response to “Canadian bar charges £9 for Bud Light to promote craft beer”

  1. Justin says:

    The final user comment in the article is absurd. Of course local craft beers can’t speak for themselves like Budweiser. It’s apples vs oranges. Local craft beers can’t spend millions of dollars on advertising. Nor can they hold their own in branding against an advertising juggernaut.

    As for the quality of the products, that is a whole other story, which the bar is probably correct to highlight, in their view as preferable.

    Branding is not the same thing as quality.

Leave a Reply to Justin Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Please note that comments are subject to our posting guidelines in accordance with the Defamation Act 2013. Posts containing swear words, discrimination, offensive language and libellous or defamatory comments will not be approved.

Subscribe to our newsletters

Sales - Global Wine Competitions

The Drinks Business
London, UK

London Account Manager

Speciality Drinks
London, UK

Sales Advisor

The Whisky Exchange
London, UK

Customer Services Administrator

Speciality Drinks
London, UK

Business Development Manager

Pol Roger Portfolio
London, UK

Business Development Executive – Spirits

Pol Roger Portfolio
London, UK

Trading Administrative Assistant

Vin-Exchange Ltd
London, UK

Events Sales Executive

The Drinks Business Hong Kong
Hong Kong

On-Trade Regional Sales Manager

Anthony Byrne Fine Wines
West Midlands, UK

Pink Rosé Festival

Cannes,France
7th Feb 2019

Wine Paris

Paris,France
11th Feb 2019
Click to view more

The Global Fortified Masters 2018

Deadline : 25th January 2019

The Global Pinot Noir Masters 2019

Deadline : 1st February 2019

Click to view more

Rioja Masters 2018

View Results

The Global Beer Competition

View Results

Click to view more