The world’s 10 biggest spirits brands

5. JACK DANIEL’S

Volume 2011: 10.6 million 9l cases
Volume 2010: 8.8 million 9l cases
Change 10-11: +22%
2011 ranking: 6

Jack Daniel’s continued its impressive growth trajectory over the course of 2011 to reach the 10 million-case mark for the first time. Such a performance is reflected in its score this year, which is up 13%.

Launches in markets such as Mexico, Netherlands and Poland has helped this rise continue.

The Tennessee whiskey is continuing to grow in its key US market, helped by the launch last year of Jack Daniel’s Tennessee Honey, dubbed The Bee. Its strong image is upheld by its powerful advertising centred on the crafting of the product and its founder, Jasper Newton “Jack” Daniel, who was born in September 1846.

Its upmarket positioning is helped by the range-topping Gentleman Jack, although the majority of sales centre on the Old No.7 label, commonly sold in bars and clubs mixed with coke.

Brand owner: Bacardi Brown-Forman
Brands
Head office: 45 Mortimer Street,
London W1W 8HJ, UK
Tel: +44 (0)20 7478 1300
Website: jackdaniels.co.uk
Brand director: Louise Snowball
PR (UK): Publicasity +44 (0)20 7632 2400
Product range: Old No.7, Gentleman
Jack, Jack Daniel’s Single Barrel,
Tennessee Honey, Jack Daniels & Cola (premix)

2 Responses to “The world’s 10 biggest spirits brands”

  1. Daniel Cajigas says:

    Thank you for the info.

  2. This list might be right in the US but it is absolutely wrong insofar as top sales in the world. The world’s top selling brand is actually a Korean soju called Jinro. Soju is like the Korean version of vodka. Seven of the Top Ten are from India or Brazil and are not likely known to you.

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