Top 10 bizarre US drinking laws

 From the practical and protective to the inexplicably bizarre, America is home to some of the world’s oddest alcohol laws.

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Men disposing of alcohol during Prohibition.

When the 21st Amendment ended the 13-year Prohibition in 1933, authority for regulating the consumption of alcohol was handed over to state lawmakers.

Caught between feeling like kids in a candy shop, their favourite libations now finally legal, and a need to maintain a level head amid its collapse, state lawmakers hastily threw together a menagerie of laws designed to maintain order.

Some were practical, necessary even, while others were simply unexplainable and by today’s standards throughly redundant. Evidently, drunken moose were such a problem in Alaska that serving them alcohol had to be outlawed.

Today, most of the more quirky laws that remain serve as a somewhat comical nod to America’s long and winding relationship with alcohol.

Click through to discover some of the strangest alcohol laws still in place today…

Have we missed any? Leave a comment below.

5 Responses to “Top 10 bizarre US drinking laws”

  1. Debra says:

    Is it illegal to give alcohol to a fish in Iowa or Ohio?

  2. rob mccaughey says:

    The vending machines haven’t been used in Pennsylvania since 2011!
    It was a much criticized experiment that lasted little more than year.

  3. Art Ohmer says:

    Georgia rescinded the Christmas closing three years ago. Art Ohmer

  4. Rachel says:

    Check out the new book The Field Guide to Drinking in America by Niki Ganong if you want to read about booze laws and booze history for all 50 states (plus Washington D.C.)

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