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Friday 21 November 2014

Winery made from old boats opens in Mexico

1st April, 2014 by Lucy Shaw

A winery with a roof made out of recycled boats has opened in Mexico’s Guadalupe Valley.

Credit Courtesy of Alejandro D'Acosta and Claudia Turrent

Vena Cava winery in Mexico’s Guadalupe Valley. Photo courtesy of Alejandro D’Acosta and Claudia Turrent

As reported by NPR, the quirky design at Vena Cava winery is the work of husband and wife duo Alejandro D’Acosta and Claudia Turrent.

The pair find inspiration by delving through junkyards and rubbish dumps – Vena Cava’s vaulted ceilings are made out from disused boats from a nearby port, while the walls are decorated with old lenses from a local eyeglass factory.

Their fifth winery design, the architects have kept the colours neutral in order for the structure to blend into the natural landscape of the Baja Guadalupe Valley.

Image courtesy of Alejandro D'Acosta and Claudia Turrent

Image courtesy of Alejandro D’Acosta and Claudia Turrent

Mexico is making inroads onto the world wine scene, spearheaded by boutique wine pioneer Hugo d’Acosta, who, with his ever growing portfolio in the Guadalupe Valley including Casa de Piedra, has been dubbed the “Robert Mondavi of Mexico”, while the Valley itself has been compared to California’s Napa Valley.

“Designing a winery is a lot like designing a factory. Even small details like the distance between the distilling equipment and the storage barrels can affect how the wine tastes,” d’Acosta told NPR.

“Wineries are a big tourist attraction in Baja, so they have to be both beautiful and functional,” he added.

Working with recycled materials, the pair have found that glass bottles work well as insulators, while water-resistant boats make for durable ceilings.

“You have to think about an object’s original use. What are its strengths? But it’s not just about functionality. When you reuse an object, part of the original soul of the object is still there,” D’Acosta told NPR.

“With seven brothers, I don’t think I ever had new clothes, so the idea of reusing things is very natural. It’s not about being rich or poor, it’s about getting the most out of what you already have,” he added.

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