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Friday 24 October 2014

Aussie wine trends: 4. Perfecting Pinot

11th January, 2013 by Patrick Schmitt - This article is over multiple pages: 1 2 3

Tapanappa foggy hill Pinot NoirBeyond stems, clones are a trendy topic, and, for example, Spedding has been removing weaker Pinot Noir clones over the last five years, replacing with Dijon/Bernard clones 777, 667, 115 and 114. Importantly, for those adopting whole bunch, Farr says the Bernard clones produce stems that lignify more readily. Nevertheless, he also believes rootstocks are more important, as they control vigour, while Kooyong’s Brown points out: “Once the vine is mature, the clone is not making as much stamp as the terroir.”

Finally, pioneering and highly respected former Petaluma winemaker Brian Croser who now makes Foggy Hill Pinot Noir from the Fleurieu Peninsula, south of Adelaide (and just north of Kangaroo Island), is already producing fine results. Speaking of his initial bottlings he says: “I’m pleased because it has the aromatics and it has the tannin. Maybe it misses a bit in the middle, but the vines are only seven years old.”

And as for the market, Scott Austin, at Geelong’s Austins, which has recently planted an extra 90 acres of Pinot Noir, says: “The market has grown, we can see it’s the future… cooler climate wines are in demand.”

Other developments already featured on thedrinksbusiness.com as part of our Top Australian 10 Wine Trends include:

5. Grenache reappraisal

6. Sauvignon/Semillon

7. Sub-regional recognition

8. Italian varieties and Moscato

9. Tasmanian fervour

10. Pricey produce

 

 

 

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