Ten unusual wine-producing areas

The world is full of strange fruit indeed. For the past two decades, the number of winemakers attempting to grow grapes for drinkable wine outside 32-52º and 28-46º latitude has only increased.

Koshu grapes in Japan, complete with protective origami paper hats

As the market for wine globalises, so too do the areas for producing it, and wine is now being produced in the likes of the tropics and Scandinavia.

Advances in technology and unfortunately, climate change have really pushed out wine-growing frontiers, spurred on by adventurous investors who see the potential to capitalise on emerging markets, for instance in China or India. And there’s always the novelty of pairing curry or sushi with the wine of the country.

But in some countries, such as Tunisia, it’s not a case of new frontiers, but rather unearthing an old and long-forgotten winemaking heritage.

The following is a whistlestop tour of some the more unusual wine suspects. New-New and New-Old, you could call them.

6 Responses to “Ten unusual wine-producing areas”

  1. Paul says:

    What about Tahiti?

  2. My wife Sandra and I went to Sula vinyards in december last year and were very plesantly surprised by the quality of there white’s and their desart wines.York close by had some good red’s the shiraz was a bit of a winner.I took some SA wines for them to taste ,and you should of seen the interest in the tasting room at Sula when I brought out a 1.5 Lt SA shiraz and a small bottle of emmerence,they were gob smacked.

  3. Marta Saenz Emanuelli says:

    Wow, this article looks almost like a clone of another published some months ago in Spanish about new latitude wines.

  4. Jonathan Rodwell says:

    I would suggest you have a look at Nova Scotia .Influenced by the Gulf stream and the tidal influence of the Bay of Fundy, its cold climate is tempered by maritime influences . It can be considered the Northern hemisphere opposite of Tasmania although is more southerly than the UK . It offers the possibility to grow Vinifera as well as Hybrids and it has a range of microclimates and soil types, which have a great deal in common with Southern England and Northern France ( Devonian Series).
    As a consultant who has worked all over the world, my impression is that it is currently one of the most exciting grape growing areas in North America.
    I am pleased to see you are rating the countries by relative cold climate – there is a large difference in what constitutes true cold climate as opposed to those benefitting from cooling breezes..

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