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Saturday 1 November 2014

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Top 10 Champagne trends for 2012

13th January, 2012 by Rupert Millar

7. Rosé will continue to grow but more gradually

Consumers still want rosé but the boom is over. There is still room to expand the rosé category thinks Beavis and Philipponnat thinks it has also managed to shed its seasonal image and is “more stable than in the past”, but as a style it is now an accepted member of the establishment – no longer as new and exciting as it once was.

Furthermore, although there is no doubt that rosé is here to stay and it is no longer viewed as a gimmick, Field does question whether rosé has enough points of difference as white Champagne does (see above) to be able to build in the manner it once did.

As can be seen from the box on page 18, rosé blossomed when it mattered experiencing enormous growth between 2003 and 2007, before suffering a 23% decline in volume by 2009 and since then bouncing back by 19%.

The pattern of vintage rosé followed a broadly similar pattern but with a steeper crash during the crisis and slightly weaker growth over 2009/2010.

Although as a category it has posted some of the strongest returns of any other Champagne style, it is telling that even before the going got tough in 2008, the tough had stopped drinking rosé.

If one compares the decline in shipments to the UK between 2007 and 2008 as the crisis glowered on the horizon, it is clear that categories such as white vintage, NV and prestige cuvées saw declines between -0.3% and -8%, whereas NV rosé dropped 9.6% and vintage rosé 23%.

2 Responses to “Top 10 Champagne trends for 2012”

  1. This is a very exciting time for the Champagne industry!

  2. I’m delighted to see confirmation of the increasing interest in what are called Grower Champagnes but a little surprised that seems the on-trade is lagging behind the off-trade in the take up of these wonderful champagnes. To any on-trade outlets that are looking to differentiate themselves Grower Champagnes offer the lot: diversity of styles, wonderful food matching opportunities, fascinating stories to delight the customer, a chance for the sommelier to show his/her knowledge and last and certainly not least, a good margin. These champagnes don’t have to be sold at a huge discount and the quality of what’s in the bottle will not only please the consumer, but more than justify a price point that yields an attractive profit

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